What’s with the Signs on the Bathroom Doors?

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What’s with the Signs on the Bathroom Doors?

Lily Grazioso and Lauren Chiasson

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The new signs on the doors of the bathrooms are not taken seriously. The 48-pt Arial font doesn’t taunt a single student in the building. How can you reinforce a rule involving the bathrooms? Students have been left wondering about the purpose of the abrupt installation of these signs, and assistant principal Dr. Lisa Maguire has the answers. 

According to Maguire, the issue is not based on teenagers who may sit on their phones instead of sitting in class. It is cemented between the law and free speech.

“We thought everyone knew that you can’t record in the bathroom,” Dr. Maguire said, adding, “We want to protect kids and uphold what the right thing to do in a social environment.” 

Maguire has seen an influx of videos involving compromising situations, especially among male students. She explained, “A kid will be filming, and there’s a young man at the urinal doing his business.” She was shocked and disgusted by the videos–not to mention the obvious lack of respect these students had for the school and their classmates. 

Other than legal reasons, concern for students’ mental health propelled the administration to enforce the policy of no technology in the restrooms. Maguire is aware that not all electronic use in the bathroom is for malicious purposes. She explained, “We also have kids who retreat to the restroom in times of need…and if they’re in a bathroom stall…we can’t help.” 

Thankfully, the administration is open to letting kids take a breather from a class to readjust themselves. “If you’re in need…we can provide that space…without questioning or hounding you for it,” Maguire said. She mentioned how the front office, nurse’s office, guidance counselor’s office, Ms. Lopes, and Dr. Howley’s office are all available for students to take a break from their classes.                                                                        

No–this doesn’t mean a teacher can walk in on you in a restroom and confiscate your phone. However, there are teachers regularly assigned on hall duty who are required to check the bathrooms. The signs are up as a warning, or as Dr. Maguire says, “So people would take a pause and wonder ‘why shouldn’t we do that?’”

Just take a minute and ask yourself, “Is this the best place to take advantage of electronics?”

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